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How to film a car using a GoPro

For the last five years, I have been working for GoPro, specialising in motorsport film production, writes Sam Werkmeister. In this article I am going to help you get the most out of your camera. GoPros are the best cameras to use for video, photo and time lapses due to its many features. You can place the camera anywhere on the vehicle, inside or out, knowing that all…

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For the last five years, I have been working for GoPro, specialising in motorsport film production, writes Sam Werkmeister. In this article I am going to help you get the most out of your camera. 

GoPros are the best cameras to use for video, photo and time lapses due to its many features. You can place the camera anywhere on the vehicle, inside or out, knowing that all GoPro mounts will hold your camera securely, to wherever you choose to position it.  

I have attached a GoPro to cars and motorbikes which have then travelled in excess of 100mph and I have never had a camera fall off. GoPro produces a range of mounts, to suit all situations. It is purely up to your imagination and creativity to push the boundaries of this amazing camera.  

What GoPro settings should I use?

The GoPro 9 camera offers the user a wide range of settings. For all video, I use either 4k 25fps or 2.7k 50fps, and I will shoot in 4:3 aspect ratio.  

Why 4:3? The GoPro’s sensor is actually a 4:3 sensor and when you use the full resolution of the sensor, you get no cropping. It means you get more top and bottom in the shot.  

One of the advantages of shooting in one of the high-resolution settings is that you can then zoom in or crop your film during editing. This means you can edit to a 16:9 aspect ratio with losing too much quality.  

However, most social media platforms allow you to publish your content in 4:3, so pretty much the only time I use 16:9 these days is when I’m publishing on YouTube. 

Even for non-action shots, shooting in 4k gives me a lot of options for cropping or using a large canvas. 

Which GoPro setting is best for slow-motion?

When I really want to push for some epic slow-motion shots, I use 1440 120fps. This enables you to capture amazing slow motion at an amazing resolution. I always switch on Hyper Smooth, the setting which makes all of your footage super smooth. If the activity needs more stabilisation, simply add the boost on the touch screen. The boost will crop into the image slightly, but it will smooth out any bumps and wobbles.  

What are the best GoPro settings for action/point-of-view filming?

2.7k 50fps 4:3 Wide Lens 

Hypersmooth – on 

Bit Rate – high 

Shutter – auto 

EV Comp – minus 0.5 

White balance – auto 

ISO Min – 200 

ISO Max – 800 

Sharpness – medium 

Colour – GoPro 

Wind – auto 

What are the best GoPro settings for B-roll or handheld filming?

4K 25fps 4:3 Wide Lens 

Hypersmooth – on (boost for extra stabilisation)  

Bit Rate – high 

Shutter – auto 

EV Comp – minus 0.5 

White balance – auto 

ISO Min – 200 

ISO Max – 800 

Sharpeness- medium 

Colour – GoPro 

Wind – auto 

What are the best GoPro settings for slow motion filming?

1440 120fps Wide Lens 

Hypersmooth – on  

Bit Rate – high 

Shutter – auto 

EV Comp – minus 0.5 

White Balance – auto 

ISO Min – 200 

ISO Max – 800 

Sharpeness – medium 

Colour – GoPro 

Wind – auto 

Mounting a GoPro to a vehicle

The Hilux is born for action, making it a perfect choice of vehicle to use in conjunction with a GoPro. I will cover how to set-up and mount your camera and film your vehicle.  

When I decide where to mount the camera, I like to plan what angles will showcase the best of the vehicle. Bonnet, roof, wheel arches, underneath and wing mirror, all of these angles are my favourites.  

I start with the GoPro suction mount which provides a secure seal on the paint work of the Hilux. I firstly hold the GoPro in the area where I want to mount. Doing this gives the assurance that I have the angle correct, plus I do not need to keep attaching and removing the mount to tweak the angle. 

I check my shot, then look at where I can securely attach the mount. All areas of the body with a gloss finish are perfect. The button in the centre of the mount will push all air out of the cup and you will be left with one of the most secure mounts.  

The Jaws clip is amazing. The grip is second to none and its low profile works well when fixing the GoPro under the vehicle. You can use the Goose Neck to extend the mount further. When using this set-up in conjunction with the Hyper Smooth setting built into the camera, you will never have a shaky shot.  

The final mount is the GoPro 3M Stickie. Whether you use the flat or curved version, these will never fall off. I will use this mount on all surfaces, in all conditions, they are waterproof as well. I use them inside the cab, to capture footage of the driver and the passengers.  

One tip: if you are finding it the GoPro 3M Stickie difficult to remove, use the stem of a screwdriver and position diagonally across the mount and twist (without touching the surface of the car). This will push from two corners and the mount should twist off.  

Using a GoPro for handheld or static shots

The GoPro is not just an action and point-of-view camera. It is amazing for filming yourself with the car or grabbing a tripod and placing the camera on the floor/wall and capturing yourself driving.  

Either place the camera itself on the floor or grab a mount and get the best angle. I carry a mini tripod with my camera at all times. I can throw the camera down and get the epic shot from a new angle, plus you can use a mini tripods as a handler and film myself vlogging.  

The new screen on the front of the GoPro enables you to check the shot, without having to look at the back screen. One tip: activate voice control and then you are handsfree, just say “GoPro start recording”. 

Using a GoPro for timelapse 

When you turn on your GoPro, you will see the video format. Use your finger and swipe from left to right. Here you will find all your time lapse, night lapse and hyper lapse film modes.  

For the time lapse, I firstly plan my angle, whether that is on a tripod or tucked away on a rock, this is completely up to you. After I have my angle, I decide what my time interval is. For shots of people moving in an area, I will use 0.5 seconds and if I was shooting a sunset, I would use between 10-30 seconds.  

The frames per second is made up of 25 frames, so each shot is 1 of 25, which is 25 of 1 second. It can be very confusing but once you have experimented, you will know exactly what setting you want before you start. Press the red button and you will start recording. I try to turn off any extra options on the camera, like the front screen – this will save battery.  

What are the best GoPro settings for timelapse filming?

When you have your location, shot and interval selected, there’s some key settings within the camera. Press the time lapse icon, then the pen icon. 

Resolution – 4K 

Lens – Wide 

Format – Video 

Interval – Depends on your situation 

Bit Rate – High 

EV comp – 0 

White balance – Auto 

ISO min – 200 

ISO max – 800 

Sharpeness – medium 

Colour – Gopro 

This is my main set-up and the majority of the time will suit most situations. One major tip when shooting time lapse is to use an external battery charger. Flip the GoPro battery door and plug your USB cable into the power, then plus the other end into a battery pack/charger.  

This will supply the power in place of the GoPro battery and keep the camera powered for hours. It is perfect for any time lapse shooting and will make sure you don’t lose power right when you need it.  

Using a GoPro to take photos

The GoPro is not only a tool to film with but also amazing for taking photos. The GoPro 9 will take photos that will rival a DSLR camera, plus you can place a GoPro in positions not many cameras can achieve.  

You can use the ‘Burst’ function to grab epic action shots, or a single photo to capture an amazing landscape. I like to use the GoPro SuperPhoto or standard setting. The SuperPhoto option will let the camera decide the best settings and give you the best possible photo.  

I also like to use the standard setting and then play with the options in ProTune, giving me more control. You can use the camera in portrait or landscape formats; portrait is the perfect dimension for Instagram Stories.  

What are the best GoPro photo settings?

Lens – Wide 

Output – Standard 

Shutter – Auto 

EV Comp – 0 

White Balance – Auto 

ISO Min – 100 

ISO Max – 800 

Sharpness – Medium 

Colour – GoPro 

Take your GoPro out of the box and enjoy. The more you use it, the more you will love it!  

NB: This piece was created using highly trained, professional photographers working off road in strictly controlled conditions and with comprehensive safety equipment. This should not be attempted on public roads at any time.

Words by Sam Werkmeister  

Image credit: Laurie McCall

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Automotive

Hybrid driving tips for best fuel economy

Want to get the very best out of your ground-breaking Toyota hybrid? We’ve gathered a number of hybrid driving hints and tips that will help you to get the best from the system, improving fuel consumption and getting you further for less.Whichever Toyota hybrid you’ve set your heart on, the following tips and pointers should…

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Want to get the very best out of your ground-breaking Toyota hybrid? We’ve gathered a number of hybrid driving hints and tips that will help you to get the best from the system, improving fuel consumption and getting you further for less.

Whichever Toyota hybrid you’ve set your heart on, the following tips and pointers should maximise the range and fuel economy of your Toyota.

The basics

It’s not just hybrids that benefit from the first seven tips – these will help to improve any car’s fuel efficiency:

  • Clear out the boot! Keeping the boot free of unnecessary weight will give your car and immediate boost in performance and economy.
  • Check your tyre pressures – dig out your owner’s manual, and do a weekly check to ensure that your tyres are correctly inflated in line with Toyota’s recommendation. Or read our handy tyre pressures article here.
  • Think ahead – by planning your journeys, you can avoid traffic jams and minimise the likelihood of getting lost.
  • Shut up! Closing the windows and sun roof at speeds above 45mph will reduce drag, reducing fuel consumption.
  • Remove unused roof racks, boxes and bike racks – they’re a real drag too!
  • Steady as she goes – maintain a steady speed and don’t go over the speed limit.
  • Smoothly does it! Try to avoid sudden braking or acceleration.

Hybrid driving: hybrid-specific tips

Sorry everyone else, but these tips are for hybrids only:

  • Become familiar with the hybrid information display so you can know how much energy is being used.
  • EV does it! Keep the car in EV mode as much as possible by using the accelerator gently, pressing it lightly but consistently.
  • Improve efficiency with ECO mode, which reduces aggressive throttle response.
  • Harvest time – braking gently and early helps the regenerative braking harvest more energy, which means EV mode can operate for longer periods.
  • Keep an eye on the dials and gauges to fully understand the hybrid system and manage the charge levels in the hybrid’s high-voltage battery.
  • If you’re in stop-start traffic, don’t put the car in neutral (‘N’) when stationary, as electricity will not be generated and the hybrid battery will discharge.
  • Consider using cruise control (where fitted) to maintain steady speeds.
  • When using climate control, Re-circulate mode reduces energy usage.
  • Think about the environment! Constant or heavy use of systems like air-con, lights and wipers will increase energy consumption.

Hybrid driving: drive modes

Toyota hybrids have four drive modes: Normal, EV, Eco and Power. When you first start your hybrid, the car defaults to the ‘Normal’ drive mode, which automatically manages the most efficient use of both the engine and the battery.

Drivers can also select one of the car’s on-demand drive modes to achieve better fuel consumption in certain settings.

These drive modes are: EV Mode where the car is powered by the battery only during city driving, running near-silent and with no tailpipe emissions; Eco Mode that reduces A/C output and lessens throttle response to limit harsh acceleration; and Power Mode which boosts acceleration by using the hybrid battery to assist the petrol engine.

The shift lever offers four positions: R (Reverse), N (neutral), B (engine braking) and D (drive). For normal driving, D (drive) is absolutely fine, but should you need it, position B has the effect of engine-braking handy when descending a steep hill, for example. It’s not recommended to leave the car in position B for normal driving, mainly because you’d end up using more fuel than necessary!

Hybrid driving: read the road ahead

Another great hybrid driving tip is to use the car’s battery whenever possible.

Another great hybrid driving tip is to use the car’s battery whenever possible. You can do this in town and urban driving by accelerating to your required speed, easing off the accelerator and then gently easing the accelerator on again. By doing this, you can activate EV mode – indicated by the dashboard light – which means that the engine has switched off and you are using the electric battery.

Try to maintain a constant speed and, as always, it’s important to read the road ahead. By doing this, you can reduce the amount of unnecessary braking and accelerating, using less fuel. Braking slowly and gently also maximises the amount of energy recovered by the regenerative braking system on the car.

Other factors to consider

Bear in mind that there are many factors that can affect a car’s performance, hybrid included. On cold days, your car will use more fuel as it warms up, but once it’s reached its optimum temperature, the MPG figures will increase.

Also, during the winter, you’re more likely to be using the air-conditioning, lights and wipers, all of which will use some electrical power from the battery. If you regularly travel the same route, don’t be surprised if you get better MPG figures during the summer than in the winter!

If you’d like more hybrid driving tips or want to discuss your driving technique with other hybrid owners, it’s worth visiting the Hypermiler website.

As a final note, please remember that these hybrid driving tips are published as general guidance on how to get the best fuel economy from your Toyota hybrid. Toyota encourages and supports safe driving at all times – please adhere to the rules of the road.

Read more: Toyota hybrid – how does it work?

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September Production Plan | Corporate | Global Newsroom

We at Toyota would like to again apologize for the repeated adjustments to our production plans due to the parts shortage resulting from the spread of COVID-19, and for causing considerable inconvenience to our customers, who have been waiting for the delivery of vehicles, suppliers, and other parties concerned. The global production volume for September…

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We at Toyota would like to again apologize for the repeated adjustments to our production plans due to the parts shortage resulting from the spread of COVID-19, and for causing considerable inconvenience to our customers, who have been waiting for the delivery of vehicles, suppliers, and other parties concerned.

The global production volume for September is expected to be approximately 850,000 units (approx. 250,000 units in Japan and 600,000 units overseas). In last month’s production plan, we announced that the average monthly production plan for the next three months (August through October) would be approximately 850,000 units, and that the planned production volume for September is in line with this plan.

At the time of this announcement, the global production plan for September through November has been revised to a higher volume, estimated to average about 900,000 units per month. This plan is based on careful confirmation of parts supply and the personnel structures and facility capacities of our suppliers. However, it remains difficult to look ahead due to the spread of COVID-19 and other factors, and we will continue to make every effort possible to deliver as many vehicles to our customers at the earliest date while closely examining the situation.

The production forecast for the fiscal year remains unchanged (approx. 9.7 million).

The following is the revised domestic operations suspension schedule for September.

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Toyota and its eclectic Cruiser collective

Toyota can trace the ‘Cruiser’ nameplate to June 1954, when technical director Hanji Umehara revealed that the new name for the off-road vehicle that had become known as the Toyota Jeep would now be the Toyota Land Cruiser. An evocative description as much as a name, Land Cruiser was also felt to resonate well within…

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Toyota can trace the ‘Cruiser’ nameplate to June 1954, when technical director Hanji Umehara revealed that the new name for the off-road vehicle that had become known as the Toyota Jeep would now be the Toyota Land Cruiser. An evocative description as much as a name, Land Cruiser was also felt to resonate well within the export market, which the model was about to pioneer on Toyota’s behalf.

Learn more: History of the Toyota Land Cruiser

Since then, more than ten million examples of the Land Cruiser have been sold, and through almost 70 years of continuous production, it has become the world’s most customer-trusted vehicle. But did you also realise that during this time some of that etymological magic has been sprinkled on a number of other Toyota models?

As you will see below, the Cruiser name has been associated with a further six distinct models. These have been bigger, smaller, roomier, retro-inspired and conceptual, yet all are connected by that common Cruiser heritage. And what’s more, one of these vehicles will see the designation go much, much further than any Land Cruiser has ever been before.

Toyota Urban Cruiser

Introduced in Europe in 2009 in response to growing customer demand for urban-friendly SUVs, the Toyota Urban Cruiser distilled the rugged, go-anywhere qualities of its distinguished big brother into a new B-segment model that was close in spirit to the original three-door RAV4.

But more than simply being compact and practical, the Urban Cruiser provided an important milestone in the motor industry. The top-spec 1.4-litre D-4D AWD model achieved the world’s lowest CO2 output for a four-wheel drive car, and in its relatively short, four-year life in the UK market played an important role in helping Toyota continue to reduce its overall emissions levels.

Toyota FJ Cruiser

Visitors to the 2003 North American International Motor Show were given an unexpected treat, with Toyota’s surprise unveiling of the FJ Cruiser concept clearly inspired by the legendary 40 Series Land Cruiser. So well-received was the design study that it returned to Detroit two years later as a full production model, initially for the left-hand drive United States market.

Based on the contemporary 120 Series Land Cruiser Prado, the FJ Cruiser had impeccable off-road credentials to back up its highly styled body. This is why the model was later produced in right-hand drive for discerning off-road markets such as Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Japan. In fact, as of January 2020 and after 14 years of continuous production, you could still buy a brand new FJ Cruiser in the Middle East.

Toyota Tj Cruiser

Fusing the roominess of a van with the aesthetics of an SUV, the Toyota Tj Cruiser was displayed at the 2017 Tokyo Motor Show as a concept designed to seamlessly dovetail work and play. The ‘T’ stood for ‘toolbox’ in reference to the vehicle’s boxlike practicality, while the lower case ‘j’ referenced the ‘joy’ drivers could experience in using its four-wheel drive chassis to reach the most inaccessible of locations.

The interior of the Tj Cruiser rivalled the Swiss Army Knife for practicality, with multi-configurable seats that could fold flat to create a double bed-size space, and sturdy side rails that could be configured to mount all sorts of accessories. The fact that the Tj Cruiser was built on the TNGA platform has led some people to predict that it is destined for production. However, we can neither confirm nor deny this assertion.

Toyota Mega Cruiser

Toyota’s answer to the American military’s Hummer H1 marked the biggest and most heavy-duty Cruiser derivative to date. In fact, similar to its US equivalent, the Japan-only Mega Cruiser was originally developed as an unstoppable infantry transport vehicle for the Japan Ground Self-Defence Force. But it was later decided that Toyota’s Gifu Auto Body subsidiary would build a very limited run of civilian models from January 1996 to August 2001.

With a footprint exceeding five metres by two metres, the Mega Cruiser must have been incredibly intimidating from the perspective of a Kei car driver. What’s more, with full-time four-wheel drive, four-wheel steering, immense ground clearance, near-vertical approach and departure angles, and grip-seeking differentials across every torque plane, there was no terrain that proved too intimidating for this monster to tackle.

Toyota Space Cruiser

The Toyota Space Cruiser was one of the first people carriers in the UK market and, despite being lauded as the only production vehicle in the world with two ‘moonroofs’, was unmistakably based on the Liteace van. That would change, of course, with its bespoke successor, the Toyota Previa of 1990. But there was still much to like about the Space Cruiser, from its eight-person capacity and (almost) mid-engine architecture to the fact it was rear-wheel drive and that the second and third row of seats could be folded flat to make a convincing double bed.

From 1983 to 1990, a grand total of 9,346 examples were sold in the UK, the majority of which were equipped with the more powerful 2.0-litre engine, as opposed to the launch 1.8-litre unit. At the time, a 2.0-litre displacement sounded generous but the Y-series engine was built for durability rather than speed. Its 87bhp output was therefore never able to propel it to warp speed.

Toyota Lunar Cruiser

This is the concept vehicle that will take the Cruiser nameplate further than ever before. The recently revealed Lunar Cruiser was given its illustrious name because the quality, durability and reliability that are necessary to keep its occupants alive in the vacuum of space are the same values that Toyota has held sacrosanct in the Land Cruiser line for 70 years.

Dwarfing even the Mega Cruiser in terms of size, proposals for the forthcoming Lunar Cruiser pitch its proportions as being approximately akin to two minibuses parked side to side. The pressurised living quarters provide 13 cubic metres of space for up to four occupants, which is about twice the size of the load volume of a long-wheelbase Toyota Proace. As the nearest refuelling station for the hydrogen fuel cell powertrain is half a million miles away, the vehicle has tanks big enough for a range of around 6,200 miles!

Toyota Compact Cruiser Concept

At the other end of the scale to the Luna Cruiser above comes this Compact Cruiser. Designed to show how the ‘Cruiser’ moniker can adapt to an all-electric and ultra-modern environment, it borrows styling cues from the first-generation Land Cruiser the Toyota Compact Cruiser Concept draws off more than 70 years of Land Cruiser and off-road heritage and even won the prestigious 2022 Car Design Award for it’s looks.

Discover more about the Toyota Land Cruiser by clicking here.

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