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Toyota’s Discerning Approach to Car-making and Challenges for the Future | Corporate | Global Newsroom

Hello everyone. My name is Keiji Yamamoto, and I am the chief product integration officer, or CPIO, of Toyota Motor Corporation. Thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedules to join us today. Automobile manufacturing today is entering an era in which there is a need to focus on various certain aspects,…

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Hello everyone. My name is Keiji Yamamoto, and I am the chief product integration officer, or CPIO, of Toyota Motor Corporation. Thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedules to join us today.

Automobile manufacturing today is entering an era in which there is a need to focus on various certain aspects, such as automated driving, electrification, and connectivity.

Software has become an important factor in determining product appeal, and, as you all know, various players who specialize in software are entering the automotive industry.

Today, I would like to mainly talk about how Toyota is taking on car-making going forward.

First, I would like to look back at the history of automobile development.

In the process of forming the core, economy-supporting industry that it represents today, the automobile has continuously changed.

The automobile has faced social issues, such as oil crises, exhaust gas regulations, increases in traffic accidents, and the aging of societies. But, each time, it has evolved and contributed to resolving social issues.

Examples include the use of aluminum and plastic in addition to steel, leading to reduced weight, as well as the shift from mechanical to electronic control, resulting in not only improved fuel efficiency, safety, and comfort but also enhanced value in terms of the car itself.

A car today is equipped with more than 50 electronic control units, or ECUs, and uses as many as 1,000 semiconductors.

Furthermore, society has entered the age of the internet, and being connected has become the norm.

Cars, as well, are now equipped with communication devices, further advancing their electronification, with the size of software growing ever larger.

Now, when it comes to the manufacturing of cars, Toyota has its own, basic stance that has been handed down from within itself over the years.

That is, we stick to our principles and internalize the important elements of car manufacturing by attempting to first achieve them on our own.

For example, since its founding, Toyota has been producing various production equipment in-house as necessary.

As a kind of side note, in the case of recovery from a fire at the Naka plant of Renesas Electronics, our engineering divisions helped by duplicating the drawings of damaged equipment and manufactured such equipment from scratch.

In the 1990s, our company engaged in the in-house design of ECUs, and it established an electronics plant, a semiconductor plant, and a battery plant. It goes without saying that these efforts led to the commercialization of the Prius.

In recent years, we have made steady progress in internalizing hydrogen-related technologies such as fuel cell stacks and hydrogen tanks, and we are now taking on the challenge of applying these to hydrogen engines. As you are all aware, Morizo himself is driving and participating in races with hydrogen engine-equipped cars.

As you can see, Toyota has always built its cars while strongly adhering to the real world regardless of the era at hand. I hope that I have helped you to see that pursuing principles and promoting internalization has formed Toyota’s basic stance.

Now, in this era of CASE, what we are paying attention to is the transition of cell phones. As the shoulder phone evolved into the feature phone and then into the smartphone, the commoditized product of the phone became linked with information, creating new value through new experiences and quickly spreading around the world. This transition has been supported by software and connected technologies.

In the same way, cars will become more linked to information, and through the movement of people, goods, and things, we would like to aim to provide new value through new experiences and by bringing excitement to our customers. I believe that this is the direction in which automobiles will evolve in the future.

In other words, going forward, we will advance our internalization of software and connected technologies.

That is why we established TRI, Woven Planet, and Toyota Connected, and it is why we are working on the development of the e-Palette, the construction of Woven City as an experimental site, and the development of the Arene platform and others.

Now, I would like to introduce Toyota’s efforts in the area of connected services and technologies and software.

To date, Toyota has made 10 million Lexus and Toyota vehicles that are connected cars, mainly in Japan, the United States, Europe, and China.

Toyota’s vision of the connected car is not simply one of connecting the car to the internet. In providing customers with emotional experiences through the movement of people, goods, and activities, Toyota wants to value a people-centered approach―in other words, what we call “human connected”.

To achieve this goal, we have built our own call center, which serves as a point of contact with customers, the Toyota Smart Center, which provides a variety of services, and the Toyota Big Data Center, which utilizes vehicle information gathered from cars, and we are providing a variety of services. Also, we have established the Mobility Services Platform, or MSPF, to provide mobility services, and are promoting collaboration with service providers.

With the e-Palette introduced to the Olympic Village for the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympic Games, our goal was to create mobility that integrates cars and information and that coordinates with the community. Already, during the Olympic Games, 34,000 athletes and other people related to the event used it. Although the e-Palette is a battery electric vehicle, or BEV, capable of automated driving, we are developing more than just automated driving and BEV technologies. We have developed a fleet management system based on the principles of the Toyota Production System to ensure that the e-Palettes at the Olympic Village operate effectively, efficiently, and accurately. The system monitors the e-Palettes remotely and operates them in a just-in-time fashion according to the surrounding environment and the number of passengers. In other words, it provides mobility that coordinates with the community. All of this has been realized via the MSPF, which Toyota has nurtured.

In the future, I believe that these efforts will be applied to the Sienna Autono-MaaS minivan being developed in the U.S. for use as a robotaxi, and that the MSPF will be used not only for automated-driving vehicles but also for regular commercial vehicles and logistics.

In this way, connected cars and connected technologies will be applied to a variety of areas, and that which is to be connected will expand to include people, cars, communities, and society. Toyota will handle the information gathered from customers and vehicles with care, and we will utilize it for the happiness of customers and the development of society while creating new value from experiences centered on mobility.

The new NX, which will soon go on sale, is also a waypoint for such.

Multimedia systems and connected services functions will be installed in the new NX as it undergoes its first complete redesign in four years.

What we insisted on were information gathered at the source and locally rooted product development.

Because road conditions and the way cars are used differ depending on the country and the region, there is a limit to the rolling out of a single package worldwide.

Connected technologies are useful in considering products that suit each region. To meet the expectations of our customers and society, we developed the new NX in each region, based on the concept of gathering information at the source.

Of course, the new NX will be capable of OTA (over-the-air) updates of its software. In addition to eliminating the time gap in the introduction of new technologies among regions, we will strive to create vehicles that reflect the ever-changing needs of our customers and local communities.

Multimedia and safety functions can also be updated, but I think our challenges are to increase the number of systems subject to OTA updates and to enhance various functions that please our customers.

Furthermore, based on a correct understanding of the characteristics of each region in the form of data, connectivity will also contribute to carbon neutrality.

Specifically, it will promote energy-efficient and resource-efficient cars.

This is a bit off-topic, but according to market data, in Japan, the engine is turned off for half of all driving time in hybrid electrified vehicles, or HEVs, while for plug-in hybrid electrified vehicles, or PHEVs, the engine is turned off for as much as 80 percent.

In other words, HEVs and PHEVs can evolve into environment-friendly vehicles to an even higher degree by upgrading the switching control of engines and electric motors.

Specifically, there is the idea of real-time changing of HEV control according to location and time of driving. The technology for this is called “geofencing technology”, and we are working to put it to practical use.

And the health of a car will be visualized by way of an electronic medical record of sorts using data collected at the source. By performing proper maintenance based on such a record, we can help increase vehicle longevity and heighten battery recyclability and reusability.

From here, I would like to talk about the future of the automotive industry and the possibilities for cars.

I believe that, for Toyota, conducting sustainable and practical car-making means flexibly responding to the demands of the times and changes in the environment and providing new value in cars to all kinds of customers through mass production.

At Toyota, we refer to mass production as “goguchi”, and I am a goguchi man to the core. I love the work of turning new ideas into products.

When I was young, I used to stay in the laboratory from morning until night, soldering away.

My role as CPIO is to bring new ideas to mass production by adding the information and the power of software of connected cars around the world to the real-world car manufacturing that Toyota has long cultivated.

And I intend to make the making of ever-better cars more locally rooted.

I believe that software has the power to promptly turn ideas into products.

To achieve this, we will establish a software development structure with 3,000 employees globally in coordination with Woven Planet, Toyota Connected, and our overseas development bases, and we will promote software development on a global scale.

I believe our entire corporate group will have a total of 18,000 employees engaged in this.

Of course, Toyota Motor Corporation will also have a full team for in-house software development.

And for the vehicle software platform Arene, which is being developed by Woven Planet, we will separate the hardware from the software and review our current so-called “rubbing together” development.

This will make software development more productive, and it will improve quality and shorten development lead time.

With Arene, we will be able to deliver new ideas to our customers as quickly as possible, and we will increase the number of people around the world who can share in the thrill of commercializing new ideas by using software.

Cars are used in a wide range of applications, including as passenger cars, in MaaS, and as commercial vehicles, and the regions in which they are deployed are expanding. Needs are becoming more and more diverse, and how cars are used is also becoming ever-more varied. Against that backdrop are day-to-day problems and broader social issues, as well as smiles and joy and needed technological development.

I believe that the value of cars will increase even more when technology is combined with innovation.

The automotive industry is still a growth industry.

I am so excited about the car-making of the future.

Please allow me to summarize my presentation today.

I believe that it is the automobile industry’s responsibility to achieve human mobility and coexistence with local communities. For the future and our children, Toyota’s goals are to provide freedom of movement for all and to provide inspiring experiences. This is rooted in our “production of happiness for all” mantra.

Toyota has always been a company that insists on internalization regardless of the era, and it has always had a realistic approach to making cars.

By combining the power of real cars and software, we would like to enhance the excitement that can be experienced only through mobility.

And by going beyond the framework of cars, we would also like to contribute to the development of society, engaging in community development and creating platforms for all of society.

I would be happy if you would continue to support us in our efforts to create cars in the real world.

Thank you very much for your attention.

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Where can I charge my car?

‘Where can I charge my car? ‘ is one of the most common questions asked by EV and PHEV drivers, especially when venturing into unfamiliar areas. The following information will provide clear answers to that question, and will also direct Toyota owners to Toyota products and services that can assist you along the way.Where can…

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Where can I charge my car? ‘ is one of the most common questions asked by EV and PHEV drivers, especially when venturing into unfamiliar areas. The following information will provide clear answers to that question, and will also direct Toyota owners to Toyota products and services that can assist you along the way.

Where can I charge my car? – Public charging

Did you know there are almost four times as many charging points in the UK than traditional fuel stations? These 32,000 individual points are distributed over almost 20,000 locations, and their number is currently increasing at a rate of around 30% a year.

But whereas traditional fuel station forecourts are readily visible from the road, public charging points are not always so easy to spot. Travel that involves public charging may therefore require a little forward planning.

The Toyota Public Charging Network offers more than 150,000 charging points throughout Europe

Toyota has also developed a Europe-wide network of public charging points that can be accessed through the Toyota Public Charging Network. More than 150,000 points are clearly displayed on the network website (see screen grab above), which has useful search and zoom functions to enable visitors to zone in on any specific area (see screen grab below). Further information is provided on each station’s immediate availability, charging speed and price per kWh.

Specific locations can be typed into the top left search box, and you can zoom into each area with the ‘+’ and ‘-‘ buttons in the bottom right

Subscribers to the Toyota Public Charging Network can access the same information through their MyT connected services app. But they also benefit from a convenient charging solution that requires just one contract and a single charging card, irrespective of the company supplying electricity from the public charger. Payment is made via a single monthly invoice.

Some satellite navigation systems can display a list of the nearest public charging stations and how far they are from your location. Alternatively, smartphone apps such as Zap-Map allow you to search for public charging points, plan longer journeys, pay on participating networks and share updates with fellow EV drivers.

See more: Searchable website map of the Toyota Public Charging Network

Home charging

What if your travel plans are less ambitious and you are confident that you will be able to return home without needing to top-up on route? In this instance, charging your EV or PHEV at home usually represents the most straightforward and cost-effective means of replenishing your vehicle’s battery.

The battery packs in electrified vehicles can always be topped-up using any domestic three-pin socket, but as this method delivers a maximum of 2.2kW per hour it is the slowest method of charging. Where possible, Toyota recommends the installation of a dedicated home charging system, which can supply electricity to the battery at a higher rate of up to 7.4kW.

Toyota has partnered with British Gas to offer UK customers a complete home charger installation service. Prices for this begin at £939 and includes the recommended charger, installation and VAT. A government fund is also available to help homeowners living in flats or rented accommodation install a home charging point.

Learn more: What is the Toyota Public Charging Network?

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2023 Toyota Corolla reviews: the first media drives

The finishing touches are currently being applied to the 2023 Toyota Corolla, which among many other changes will debut the fifth-generation of our world-leading, full hybrid petrol-electric powertrain. Members of the national motoring press were recently invited to test pre-production prototypes in both Hatchback and Touring Sports guise, including back-to-back comparisons with current 1.8-litre models.…

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The finishing touches are currently being applied to the 2023 Toyota Corolla, which among many other changes will debut the fifth-generation of our world-leading, full hybrid petrol-electric powertrain. Members of the national motoring press were recently invited to test pre-production prototypes in both Hatchback and Touring Sports guise, including back-to-back comparisons with current 1.8-litre models. What did they think of this thoroughly refreshed model? What were their 2023 Toyota Corolla reviews?

Below is a selection of excerpts from their online reviews, which include a numerical rating where applicable. To read the full reports, simply click on the emboldened links.

2023 Toyota Corolla reviews:

“The latest refinement benefits… particularly the 1.8 Hybrid. For 2023, it’s getting a 24bhp boost to 138bhp, for a 0-62mph sprint of 9.2sec. The point of the exercise is not so much to make the entry-level Corolla a fast car, but more to improve drivability.

“Toyota has also recalibrated the drive modes. [In Eco mode] the updated car… makes better use of the increased potency of the electric motor and waits for longer before it has the engine working. That makes the car feel more relaxed without noticeably compromising performance. At anything less than full throttle, the gearbox will build in some shift points and avoid holding maximum revs wherever possible. It helps that the 1.8 engine is a refined one, so when it pipes up, it’s not grating. Economy remains impressive: at the end of our test route, the car was indicating 57.7mpg.

This is a successful update of an already well-rounded family car

“Just as valuable in daily usage… are the improvements to the brakes. The pedal is now more progressive and allows clean limo-drive stops. The new car also uses the radar for the adaptive cruise control to judge how much regenerative braking it should apply when you lift off the throttle.”

“Exterior changes include a new mesh pattern for the front grille, fresh alloy wheel designs, and on some trim grades, new bi-LED headlights. [Inside] there are embossed patterns aimed at giving trim pieces and upholstery a ‘three-dimensional depth’, a new 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster (on mid-range trim and upwards) and a 10.5-inch touchscreen infotainment system.

“The biggest changes of all concern the powertrain. The updated Corolla’s redesigned lithium-ion battery pack is smaller yet more powerful, and the same goes for the motor unit. The 1.8-litre car… has a total system power of 138bhp, an increase of 14%. This is immediately obvious the first time you apply a generous amount of throttle. This isn’t only down to the power increase – Toyota’s hybrid and CVT tweaks have worked wonders. Toyota’s intention is for the response of the set-up to be more closely aligned with throttle inputs.

The Corolla does a remarkable job of replicating an EV-like driving experience

“At cruising speeds, the engine revs sit around 500rpm lower than before, making the Corolla more relaxing over longer distances. At lower speeds, the Corolla does a remarkable job of replicating an EV-like driving experience… making stop/start traffic a far more relaxing experience. It remains an efficient set-up – we achieved around 57mpg despite driving in an often less than sympathetic way to test the recalibrated powertrain.”

2023 Toyota Corolla reviews:

“This revised Corolla features the fifth-generation version of Toyota’s hybrid system, bringing a big boost in performance to the 1.8-litre model in particular, as well claiming improved refinement and response. The safety and infotainment tech gets an upgrade, too. Fundamentally, this remains a sharp-looking, comfort-orientated family car, with… a petrol-electric hybrid powertrain line-up that… shouldn’t be sniffed at as a stop-gap to going full EV.

“The lithium-ion battery pack has a 14% greater output, a 14% (18kg) lower weight and is more compact. The control electronics are more efficient and quieter. And the electric motors are more powerful. Put this together with a substantial amount of recalibration and the additional torque-fill now available from the gutsier e-motors… [and] the new 1.8-litre Corolla is more of a surprising transition than the overall increase might lead you to suspect.

Over a mixed driving route… the car was reporting it had been in EV mode 72% of the time. Toyota’s hybrid tech has really come of age

“The updated car is immediately more brisk. A lot of work has gone into remapping the accelerator response so it better matches driver intentions, dialling back the revs the CVT requires for a given amount of progress. It is also quieter at speed.

“The car can [also] use the adaptive cruise control gear to automatically vary the amount of deceleration you get when you lift off the throttle. This… simply means it maintains a safe distance from the car in front without you having to intervene with the friction brakes, even when slowing almost to a stop. This is so unexpectedly polished that it turns [the Corolla] into a one-pedal driving experience much of the time – something that’s usually the reserve of pure EVs.”

“Updates to the Toyota Corolla’s hybrid system mean that the latest version of the entry-level 1.8-litre engine has 138bhp at its disposal. [That’s] more than enough performance for everyday driving and getting up to motorway speeds without needing to mash the accelerator into the carpet.

“Fancy a bit of pampering? Well, forget the spa and buy yourself a Corolla instead because… it’s one of the most comfortable cars in the family car class. It has softer suspension than [some other rivals], which means it smooths off the rough edges of road ridges better and fidgets less on patchy sections of motorway.

The Toyota Corolla is a brilliant family car. It’s comfortable, well made, well equipped and remarkably frugal in real-world driving

“When you’re driving normally, you’ll find that the Corolla is a fine handling car. The steering is precise and its weight builds in a progressive manner, starting light for city driving and ending up with a heft that’s reassuring. There’s even a reasonable amount of feedback streaming to your fingertips [and] a decent feeling of composure at faster speeds.”

Learn more: 2023 Toyota Corolla revealed

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Sales, Production, and Export Results for May 2022 | Sales, Production, and Export Results | Profile | Company

Toyota Motor Corporation works to develop and manufacture innovative, safe and high-quality products and services that create happiness by providing mobility for all. We believe that true achievement comes from supporting our customers, partners, employees, and the communities in which we operate. Since our founding over 80 years ago in 1937, we have applied our…

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Toyota Motor Corporation works to develop and manufacture innovative, safe and high-quality products and services that create happiness by providing mobility for all. We believe that true achievement comes from supporting our customers, partners, employees, and the communities in which we operate. Since our founding over 80 years ago in 1937, we have applied our Guiding Principles in pursuit of a safer, greener and more inclusive society. Today, as we transform into a mobility company developing connected, automated, shared and electrified technologies, we also remain true to our Guiding Principles and many of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals to help realize an ever-better world, where everyone is free to move.

SDGs Initiatives https://global.toyota/en/sustainability/sdgs/

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