Connect with us

Google

These Googlers stepped it up for Walktober

Yousuf Fauzan’s mother knew she’d be on the phone a lot this October. Every day during the month, she’d talk to her son for hours as he paced around his home in California. “She would get irritated, she would disconnect the call, then I’d call again 15 minutes later.”Calling his mom — and pretty much…

Published

on

Yousuf Fauzan’s mother knew she’d be on the phone a lot this October. Every day during the month, she’d talk to her son for hours as he paced around his home in California. “She would get irritated, she would disconnect the call, then I’d call again 15 minutes later.”

Calling his mom — and pretty much everyone he knows — was how Yousuf, a YouTube software engineer, passed the time while getting his steps in for “Walktober,” Google’s annual employee walking competition. “I don’t talk to people on the phone often, but during October, I call anyone and everyone I’ve ever known.” After spending his workday walking during meetings, Yousuf would lap around the inside of his condo from 7:00 p.m. until 4:00 a.m. to hold his top spot on the leaderboard. By the end of the month, he’d accumulated more than two million steps.

Planning lead Tiffany Bartish-Katz says this is the kind of “fierce but friendly” competition that Walktober attracts. Started in 2011 as a local effort in Google’s Cambridge, Massachusetts office, Walktober quickly went global: This year, more than 26,000 employees across 190 offices joined the competition, putting in over five billion steps. “I’m always a little awestruck by the number of people who engage in this very simple, friendly, fun, grassroots project,” Tiffany says. And the planning team works hard to make sure everyone gets in the spirit — from ultra walkers like Yousuf, to those who are adding just a few more thousand steps to their routines.

Some Walktober participants decided to put their step counts towards a good cause. Last year, Greg Kroleski, a Google Cloud Product Manager, walked for 24 hours straight. As he considered doing another 24-hour challenge this year, a coworker suggested tying it to a fundraiser. “A lot of people paid attention last year. I wanted to direct that attention to something good.” Greg dedicated this year’s challenge, and his team’s entire Walktober effort, to raise awareness for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CF), a chronic disease that causes overwhelming fatigue. He and his colleagues ended up raising $14,000. As for the 24-hour challenge? Greg logged over 204,000 steps that day, breaking a Google Walktober record…for a few hours, at least. “Unfortunately, the next day, someone else broke my record.” All the more reason to give it another go next year. “You might see me again,” he says.

Source

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Google

Countering hack-for-hire groups

As part of TAG’s mission to counter serious threats to Google and our users, we’ve published analysis on a range of persistent threats including government-backed attackers, commercial surveillance vendors, and serious criminal operators. Today, we’re sharing intelligence on a segment of attackers we call hack-for-hire, whose niche focuses on compromising accounts and exfiltrating data as…

Published

on

By

As part of TAG’s mission to counter serious threats to Google and our users, we’ve published analysis on a range of persistent threats including government-backed attackers, commercial surveillance vendors, and serious criminal operators. Today, we’re sharing intelligence on a segment of attackers we call hack-for-hire, whose niche focuses on compromising accounts and exfiltrating data as a service.

In contrast to commercial surveillance vendors, who we generally observe selling a capability for the end user to operate, hack-for-hire firms conduct attacks themselves. They target a wide range of users and opportunistically take advantage of known security flaws when undertaking their campaigns. Both, however, enable attacks by those who would otherwise lack the capabilities to do so.

We have seen hack-for-hire groups target human rights and political activists, journalists, and other high-risk users around the world, putting their privacy, safety and security at risk. They also conduct corporate espionage, handily obscuring their clients’ role.

To help users and defenders, we will provide examples of the hack-for-hire ecosystem from India, Russia, and the United Arab Emirates and context around their capabilities and persistence mechanisms.

Source

Continue Reading

Google

Preserving languages and the stories behind them

Our Potawatomi tribe partner, Justin Neely, is using Woolaroo to promote and preserve the Potawatomi’s language, Bodéwadmimwen, among students and young people. “Words, phrases and verb conjugations show how the Potawatomi see the world — with an emphasis on connection to the earth, a high regard for mother nature and living beings, and a communal…

Published

on

By

Our Potawatomi tribe partner, Justin Neely, is using Woolaroo to promote and preserve the Potawatomi’s language, Bodéwadmimwen, among students and young people. “Words, phrases and verb conjugations show how the Potawatomi see the world — with an emphasis on connection to the earth, a high regard for mother nature and living beings, and a communal lifestyle,” says Neely. Neely felt that Woolaroo would suit children in particular, allowing them to use technology as a way to explore their heritage.

Source

Continue Reading

Google

Go on an epic adventure with Netflix’s “The Sea Beast”

Craving a different type of drive this summer? Go on a high-seas adventure without stepping off land. Activate Waze’s latest driving experience, inspired by Netflix’s newest movie, “The Sea Beast.” (Check out the trailer and the film on Netflix July 8.)Starting today, you’ll meet the dynamic duo of Maisie, a precocious stowaway, and Blue, a…

Published

on

By

Craving a different type of drive this summer? Go on a high-seas adventure without stepping off land. Activate Waze’s latest driving experience, inspired by Netflix’s newest movie,The Sea Beast.” (Check out the trailer and the film on Netflix July 8.)

Starting today, you’ll meet the dynamic duo of Maisie, a precocious stowaway, and Blue, a little beast with a huge mischief streak, and revel in the unlikely comedy of their friendship as they help you navigate every turn you take on Waze. And don’t worry: Maisie will help translate Blue’s sounds for you. You’ll also get to know some other Beasts that they find on their journey when you choose between three new Moods: Blue, Red and Yellow. Don’t forget to swap your vehicle for a Lifeboat, to get into the true adventurer’s spirit.

With Sea Beast Mode activated, get ready to explore the world together, on a journey full of surprise, wonder and funny banter — because where the map ends, the adventure begins.

If you’re interested in seeing the magic in real life, Netflix is hosting a series of experiences across the U.S. at aquariums, museums and more to celebrate the launch of The Sea Beast.

For a drive that takes you to the seas, visit Waze or click “My Waze” in your Waze app and tap the “Turn on Sea Beast Mode” banner to activate. It’s available globally, in English, for a limited time.

Source

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2021 Today's Digital.